Below are historic HSA levels that may be needed for back filing.

Annual Contribution Limits 2016 and 2017 Compared

The following chart from shrm.org shows the comparison of the 2016 and 2017 HSA limits as defined by the IRS’s Revenue Procedure 2015-30, issued May 5, 2015.

Please note: The printed maximum below is the out-of-pocket maximum that applies to HSAs only. The general out-of-pocket maximum was a little higher at $6,600 for an individual and $13,200 for a family in 2015.

Contribution and Out-of-Pocket Limits for Health Savings Accounts and High-Deductible Health Plans 2017
For 2016 For 2017 Change
HSA contribution limit
(employer + employee)
Individual: $3,350

Family: $6,750

Individual: $3,400

Family: $6,750

Individual:+$50

Family: no change

HSA catch-up contributions
(age 55 or older)*
$1,000 $1,000 No change**
HDHP minimum deductibles Individual: $1,300

Family: $2,600

Individual: $1,300

Family: $2,600

Individual: no change

Family: no change

HDHP maximum out-of-pocket
(deductibles, co-payments and other amounts, but not premiums)
Individual: $6,550

Family: $13,100

Individual: $6,550

Family: $13,100

Individual: no change

Family: no change

* Catch-up contributions can be made any time during the year in which the HSA participant turns 55.
** Unlike other limits, the HSA catch-up contribution amount is not indexed; any increase would require statutory change.

Minimums, Maximums, and Limits for 2019 HSAs

For 2019 a Health Savings Account can be paired with any plan with an annual deductible of more than $1,350 for self-only coverage or $2,700 for family coverage, AKA any High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP).[1][2]

The 2019 HSA chart below shows several figures pertaining to HSAs and health plans.

  1. The minimum deductible, which is the minimum deductible your High Deductible Health Plan must have after cost assistance.
  2. The maximum out-of-pocket is the highest maximum a plan can have to qualify for an HSA.
  3. The contribution limit, which is the total you can contribute in 2019 if you are under 55. Those 55 or older can contribute an extra $1,000, and this is shown in the fourth column.

TIP: You have until you file taxes for 2019 to fund your HSA for 2019 health plans (meaning if you did extended filing for 2020 you can still fund your HSA until you actually file).

HSA Chart for 2019

Below is a chart that shows the limits and thresholds for HSAs for 2019.

2018 Minimum Deductible Maximum Out-of-Pocket Contribution Limit 55+ Contribution
Single $1,350 $6,750 $3,500 +$1,000
Family $2,700 $13,500 $7,000 +$1,000
TIP: All the figures have increased from last year. See the HSA chart from 2018 here.

Annual Out-of-Pocket Expenses Limits for HSAs 2017

Annual out-of-pocket expenses (deductibles, copayments, and other amounts, but not premiums) cannot exceed $6,550 for self-only coverage and $13,100 for family coverage.

The annual out-of-pocket limit is almost the same as the maximum out-of-pocket limits for all 2017 plans. Once you reach your plan’s out-of-pocket maximum, your insurer covers 100% of your costs.

You can pay all of your out-of-pocket expenses for the year on even the highest deductible plan tax-free using an HSA if you have enough money in your HSA. You cannot fund dental and vision. Remember that you can only put in about half of that a year, so you’d have to have funds rolled over from other years.

Annual Contribution Limits for HSAs 2016

For 2016 annual contribution limit for your HSA is $3,350 for an individual and $6,750 for a family (family limit increased $100).

HSA holders 55 and older can contribute an extra $1,000 tax-deductible dollars to their HSA, $4,350 for an individual and $7,750 for a family.

NOTE: you can contribute as much as you want to your HSA, but only contributions up to the limit will be deductible from your gross income!

2016 Minimum Deductible Maximum Out-of-Pocket Contribution Limit 55+ Contribution
Single $1,300 $6,550 $3,350 +$1,000
Family $2,600 $13,100 $6,650 +$1,000

Annual contribution limitation. For the calendar year 2016, the annual limitation on deductions under § 223(b)(2)(A) for an individual with self-only coverage under a high deductible health plan is $3,350. For the calendar year 2016, the annual limitation on deductions under § 223(b)(2)(B) for an individual with family coverage under a high deductible health plan is $6,750. IRS

Annual Contribution Limits for HSAs 2015

Each year you can contribute dollars tax-free to your HSA up to a certain limit. The annual contribution limit for your HSA is $3,350 for an individual and $6,650 for a family.

HSA holders 55 and older can contribute an extra $1,000 tax-deductible dollars to their HSA, $4,350 for an individual and $7,650 for a family.

NOTE: you can contribute as much as you want to your HSA, but only contributions up to the limit will be deductible from your gross income!

2015 Minimum Deductible Maximum Out-of-Pocket Contribution Limit 55+ Contribution
Single $1,300 $6,450 $3,350 +$1,000
Family $2,600 $12,900 $6,650 +$1,000

Annual contribution limitation. For the calendar year 2015, the annual limitation on deductions under § 223(b)(2)(A) for an individual with self-only coverage under a high deductible health plan is $3,350. For the calendar year 2015, the annual limitation on deductions under § 223(b)(2)(B) for an individual with family coverage under a high deductible health plan is $6,650. IRS

Citations

  1. 2019 HSA Limits Rise, IRS Says. Shrm.org.
  2. Revenue Procedure 2018-30. IRS.gov. PDF