The federal poverty level is $13,590 for an individual ($27,750 for a family of 4) for 2023 coverage. The federal poverty level is $12,880 for an individual ($26,500 for a family of 4) for 2022 coverage. The federal poverty level is $12,760 for an individual ($26,200 for a family of 4) for 2021 coverage.[1][2][3]

The maximum amount to get tax credits is 400% of the poverty level. If you go over 400% by any amount you’ll have to pay back tax credits.

You may also qualify for Medicaid if you make less than 138% of the poverty level depending on your state (or even more for CHIP).

TIP: See the full 2020 poverty guidelines, the full 2021 poverty guidelines, and the full 2022 poverty guidelines for more detailed information.

48 CONTIGUOUS STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Persons in Family/Household 2021 Coverage (2020 Poverty Levels) 2022 Coverage (2021 Poverty Levels) 2023 Coverage (2022 Poverty Levels)
1 $12,760 $12,880 $13,590
2 $17,240 $17,420 $18,310
3 $21,720 $21,960 $23,030
4 $26,200 $26,500 $27,750
5 $30,680 $31,040 $32,470
6 $35,160 $35,580 $37,190
7 $39,640 $40,120 $41,910
8 $44,120 $44,660 $46,630
For families/households with more than 8 persons, add $4,480 for each additional person for 2021 coverage, add $4,540 for 2022 coverage, and add $4,720 for 2023 coverage.

NOTE: Alaska and Hawaii use different guidelines. See the Federal Register links below for Alaska and Hawaii guidelines.

FACT: The Federal Register notice for the 2023 Poverty Guidelines was published on January 21st, 2022.

FACT: The Federal Register notice for the 2021 Poverty Guidelines was published on February 1st, 2021.

FACT: The Federal Register notice for the 2020 Poverty Guidelines was published on January 17, 2020.

Citations

  1. notice 2020-00858. Federalregister.gov.
  2. notice 2021-01969. Federalregister.gov.
  3. A Notice by the Health and Human Services Department on 01/21/2022. Federalregister.gov.