Affordable Health Care and the Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act (not the Affordable Healthcare Act) is the US healthcare reform law. The law makes healthcare and health insurance more affordable and more available to more Americans. It does this through new consumer protections, new rules and regulations on the healthcare industry, by creating a marketplace for subsidized insurance, and by reforming and expanding public healthcare programs like Medicare and Medicaid. The Affordable Care Act also includes measures to cut the growth in healthcare spending in the US.

Sometimes people call the Affordable Care Act the Affordable Health Care Act. It’s an easy switch-up considering one of the main focuses of the law is to make healthcare (specifically health insurance) more affordable for more Americans.

Affordable Care ActThe Affordable Healthcare Act is The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Sometimes mistakingly called the Affordable Healthcare Act, The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is the official name for the new healthcare law. Since that name is so long people usually refer to the law as the Affordable Care Act or ObamaCare, or just say ACA, PPACA for short.

The Affordable Care Act was signed on March 23, 2010 by President Barack Obama and includes about 400 sections of reforms to the health insurance and healthcare industry. We discuss the law in depth on our site but we suggest taking a moment to skim over a summary of each provision in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act so you can know what is in it for yourself.

If your ready to get insurance now just click here to find your State’s health insurance marketplace to apply for and enroll in subsidized health insurance plan.

Ways the ACA Addresses Affordable HealthCare

The ACA addresses affordable healthcare and affordable health insurance in a number of ways including but not limited to:

• People with preexisting conditions can’t be charged more or denied treatment.

• There are no more annual or lifetime dollar limits on care.

• The marketplaces subsidize premium costs and out-of-pocket costs.

• A single risk pool is created giving the individual and small group markets the same buying power as large group markets.

• New rules and regulations stop insurance companies from making unjustified rate hikes.

• Women cannot be charged more than men.

• The amount insurers can discriminate price based on facts like age is restricted.

• All plans must have minimum benefits regardless of cost.

• Medicaid is expanded meaning free or low-cost insurance for more Americans.

• Young adults can stay on their parents plan until 26.

• Medicare gets a big overhaul meaning cheaper care for seniors and less costs for hospitals.

• Doctors for the most part will see their rates stay the same or, in the case of Medicaid doctors will see their rates increase.

• Hospitals are incentivized to provide quality care over quantity care.

• and more.

What is “Affordable” HealthCare / What is “Affordable” Health Insurance

The Affordable Care Act defines affordable health insurance as cost less than 8% of your annual modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) after subsidies. If you can’t find a plan on your State’s marketplace that will cost less than 8% of your families income you won’t be required to buy insurance for 2014, the good news is that most Americans shopping in the private market will be able to find an affordable option under the Affordable Care Act.

Should I Shop on the Affordable HealthCare Marketplace?

Every State has their own health insurance marketplace, but most State’s have a unique name for their marketplace. Whether you buy your insurance through a broker, the marketplace, or direct from a provider all “metal plans” (those are plans qualified to be sold on the marketplaces) will have the same prices. The law includes wording that ensures that when a broker or provider signs you up for insurance they can’t charge you more for the same plan you could buy through the marketplace. So if you would like help shopping you can either use the marketplace and talk to the navigators there or you can go direct through a broker or provider. For those who are not eligible for subsidies going through a provider or broker may be best, for those with lower-incomes the marketplace will most likely be the best bet for you.

Is the Affordable Care Act Good or Bad?

Whether the ACA is good or bad is a matter of opinion. Most people will get better quality care and more rights and many will get insurance for the first time or be able to get insurance due to affordability. Others will pay more for a plan equivalent to what they had before. The healthcare crisis in America is very real and the ACA addresses that, whether the costs outweigh the benefits is a personal choice. Remember the ACA doesn’t just do one thing, it does hundreds so before you stand behind or against the law take some time to educate yourself in regards to the facts and don’t forget to shop for affordable insurance on the health insurance marketplace. Please use our site as a resource to learn about the act yourself.