what-has-obama-accomplished

Articles Relating to President Obama’s 2016 JAMA Article “United States Health Care Reform Progress to Date and Next Steps”

President Obama published a summary of the ACA’s successes and suggestions for the future in JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association).

The summary was published along side three editorials from Peter Orszag, former director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Obama; Stuart Butler, a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution and former director of the Center for Policy Innovation at The Heritage Foundation; and coauthors Jonathan Skinner, the James O. Freedman Presidential Professor of Economics at Dartmouth and Amitabh Chandra, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

These are accompanied an introductory article by JAMA’s Howard Bauchner. Together they offer a number of viewpoints on the past, present, and future of healthcare reform.

The President’s Summary of the Affordable Care Act

United States Health Care Reform Progress to Date and Next Steps – Barack Obama

Introductory Article

The Affordable Care Act and the Future of US Health Care -Howard Bauchner

Responses to President’s Summary of the ACA

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Bill Goodwin on

This is fantastic. I hope that this sets a standard for publishing policy data and debating the outcomes and conclusions for best practices in governance. This is the right kind of discourse. I would like to have seen less personalized commentary (e.g. “I am proud of …”) keeping to a best effort of factual data in making the case for conclusions. I’m very happy to see this published along with the responses. I hope the dialogue continues and we find ways to continue the things that are working and improve or replace the things that are not.

Frankly, from reading these, I feel like we need a few more years of data to help filter out the noise in the data and restrict the partisan biases on either side before real meaningful conclusions can be drawn.